The low down on Apple’s Q4 call: It’s not all shiny…

With Apple coming under exceedingly pressure and demand from consumers and analysts, when it comes to a financial call, everyone hones in. Like vultures, swarming, but a little less violent and graphic. Tim Cook held the companies Q4 Financial Call on Monday 28th October, just under a week since Apple announced new MacBooks and iPads.

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So what does the world look like out of the eyes of Apple? Is is all rosy, pristine and shiny, like the back of an iPhone 5C, or more dull and bland? Well here are the raw figures, the pure data, Apple released minutes before the call:

Good

  • Revenue came in at $37.5bn this quarter, up from $35.3bn last quarter. This also beat analysts expectations.
  • Earns per share were also beaten, standing at $7.92 with a total of $8.26 per diluted share.
  • A new record of 33.8 million iPhones were sold.
  • Gross margin was at 37%, as expected.
  • Revenue in Japan grew 40%, while in China the growth was 6%.
  • Apple acquired 15 new companies in 2013.
  • Over $1 billion were generated in education sales for the first time.
  • $36 billion has been returned to share holders in the last 5 years.
  • $146.8bn is the total amount of cash that Apple holds in its bank, unsurprisingly with only $35.5 bn of that cash hoard in the US.
  • iTunes made a revenue of $4.4 bn and the Apple retail stores generates $4.5bn worth of sales.
  • Apple expects to make a record $58bn next quarter.

The Bad

  • Mac sales declined by 4.6%, above expectations.
  • Net profit was $7.5bn compared to the $8.8bn last year.
  • 14.1 million iPads were sold this year, only a smidgen up from 14 million last years – also lower than expectations.
  • iPod sales dropped 35% from 5 million units to only 3.49 million, based upon Q4 2012.

Apple’s general trend is vibrant, they’re not in the dog house like Blackberry. But more often than not, Apple is missing expectations – this might be down to analysts over estimating Apple or the simple fact they can’t keep up.

Source: Apple

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